Detector Loops for Detection.

Detector Loops (inductive loop detectors) Factory Authorized Distributor / Dealer. BD Loops are for parking lots, intersections, drive through restaurants, gates, barrier gate operators, bicycles and pedestrian control products. Competitive pricing on pre-formed detector loops, saw cut detector loops, direct burial detector loops, detector loop checker, TB kit (saw cut installation kit), pizza wheel, loop detector sealant, and loop detector sealant applicators.  We are patriots that sell loop detectors, loop detector backer rods, and loop detector sealant (Bondo, RAI) for DoorKing, Magnetic, Osco, and Linear barrier gate operators, vehicle counters, traffic lights, speed detection devices, and other traffic controls for vehicle sensing, at discount.

Division of: GR8 Holdings LLC

8340 N. Thornydale Rd. #110-160
Tucson, Arizona 85714

CALL: (520) 303-4444

TireShark™ brand Traffic Spikes by TrafficSpikesUSA.com / Monsoon Mfg. LLC. One-way access control systems for road traffic, retractable tire poppers, Tiger Teeth, Cobra, Enforcer motorized spike strips for in-ground & surface installation, directional treadle systems for in-bound and out-bound pneumatic tires. Discount: apartment complex, shopping center, mall, airport, military base, factory and business to protect parking lot, employee, security, public access, commercial property. Contractors welcome. TireShark™ brand Traffic Spikes by TrafficSpikesUSA.com / Monsoon Mfg. LLC. One-way access control systems for road traffic, retractable tire poppers, Tiger Teeth, Cobra, Enforcer motorized spike strips for in-ground & surface installation, directional treadle systems for in-bound and out-bound pneumatic tires. Discount: apartment complex, shopping center, mall, airport, military base, factory and business to protect parking lot, employee, security, public access, commercial property. Contractors welcome.

We manufacture TireShark™ Traffic Spikes & distribute for other makers.

Detector Loops (inductive loop detectors) Factory Authorized Distributor / Dealer. BD Loops are for parking lots, intersections, drive through restaurants, gates, barrier gate operators, bicycles and pedestrian control products. Competitive pricing on pre-formed detector loops, saw cut detector loops, direct burial detector loops, detector loop checker, TB kit (saw cut installation kit), pizza wheel, loop detector sealant, and loop detector sealant applicators. We are patriots that sell loop detectors, loop detector backer rods, and loop detector sealant (Bondo, RAI, Chemque) for DoorKing, Magnetic, Osco, and Linear barrier gate operators, vehicle counters, traffic lights, speed detection devices, and other traffic controls for vehicle sensing, at discount. Brands are: BEA, Diablo Controls, EDI, Elite, EMX, Northstar, Reno A&E, Sarasota, and US Traffic / PEEK. Used at HOA, shopping center, malls, airports, municipalities, military bases/installations, factories and businesses to protect parking lots, employee, security, and public access, private and commercial property. Protec your controls against RF. We ship BD pre formed detector loops world-wide.

Barrier Gate Operators!  Factory Authorized Distributor of Magnetic Autocontrol Corporation and Guardian Traffic Control and Guardian Gate Hardware manufactured by the Antech Corporation. Our offices are located 2 blocks from this major manufacturer, in business since 1949. Take advantage of our hands-on, eyes-on capability to observe your order being manufactured to your specifications. Competitive pricing. Feel safer with turnstiles, one-way access control systems, road traffic control systems, retractable tire traffic spikes, super heavy duty hinges, gate operators (upswung arms for passage), speed bumps, key switches, Cobra, Cobra II, StingRay, and Enforcer brands, spike strips for both in-ground and on-ground directional treadle systems for in-bound and out-bound pneumatic tires. We sell at discount to apartment complexes, shopping center, malls, airports, military bases/installations, factories and businesses to protect parking lots, employee, security, and public access, private and commercial property. Systems can be one-way or two-way, above ground, on ground, flat mount, or surface mount... hydraulic options.
Factory Authorized Distributor of Guardian Traffic Control and Guardian Gate Hardware manufactured by the Antech Corporation. Our offices are located 2 blocks from this major manufacturer, in business since 1949. Take advantage of our hands-on, eyes-on capability to observe your order being manufactured to your specifications. Competitive pricing. Feel safer with one-way access control systems, road traffic control systems, retractable tire traffic spikes, super heavy duty hinges, gate operators (upswung arms for passage), speed bumps, key switches, Cobra, Cobra II, StingRay, and Enforcer brands, spike strips for both in-ground and on-ground directional treadle systems for in-bound and out-bound pneumatic tires. We sell at discount to apartment complexes, shopping center, malls, airports, military bases/installations, factories and businesses to protect parking lots, employee, security, and public access, private and commercial property. Systems can be one-way or two-way, above ground, on ground, flat mount, or surface mount... hydraulic options. Factory Authorized Distributor of Guardian Traffic Control and Guardian Gate Hardware manufactured by the Antech Corporation. Our offices are located 2 blocks from this major manufacturer, in business since 1949. Take advantage of our hands-on, eyes-on capability to observe your order being manufactured to your specifications. Competitive pricing. Feel safer with one-way access control systems, road traffic control systems, retractable tire traffic spikes, super heavy duty hinges, gate operators (upswung arms for passage), speed bumps, key switches, Cobra, Cobra II, StingRay, and Enforcer brands, spike strips for both in-ground and on-ground directional treadle systems for in-bound and out-bound pneumatic tires. We sell at discount to apartment complexes, shopping center, malls, airports, military bases/installations, factories and businesses to protect parking lots, employee, security, and public access, private and commercial property. Systems can be one-way or two-way, above ground, on ground, flat mount, or surface mount... hydraulic options.

Q-Seal 290 Detector Loop Sealant

CALL NOW TO ORDER: (520) 303-4444

One tube may seal 9-15 feet of cut, depending upon actual conditions. Always purchase an extra tube or two to make sure that you have enough!

Q-Seal 290 Detector Loop Sealant is a one component thixotropic (thickened, like paste) moisture curing polyurethane sealant. It is designed for use in both asphalt and concrete pavement to provide a weather and chemical resistant waterproof seal. This product requires no catalyst. Detector Loops (inductive loop detectors) Factory Authorized Distributor / Dealer. BD Loops are for parking lots, intersections, drive through restaurants, gates, barrier gate operators, bicycles and pedestrian control products. Competitive pricing on pre-formed detector loops, saw cut detector loops, direct burial detector loops, detector loop checker, TB kit (saw cut installation kit), pizza wheel, loop detector sealant, and loop detector sealant applicators.  We are patriots that sell loop detectors, loop detector backer rods, and loop detector sealant (Bondo, RAI) for DoorKing, Magnetic, Osco, and Linear barrier gate operators, vehicle counters, traffic lights, speed detection devices, and other traffic controls for vehicle sensing, at discount.

USES


Q-Seal 290 is primarily used as a protective seal for traffic detector wire loops employed in actuated intersections. It may be used as a sealant for saw cuts in concrete or asphalt surfaces. Use of this sealant may help to reduce the effects of weather upon the disturbance of the cut made into the roadway surface.

CURING


Q-Seal 290 will begin to dry ‘skin over’ in approximately 3 hours at 77°F and 50% R.H. At temperatures below 77°F this product will take a proportionately longer time to cure. At temperatures above 77°F it will take a proportionately shorter time to cure.

SURFACE PREPARATION


The roadway should be dry, dust free and as smooth as possible before installation of Q-Seal 290. It is recommended that air and roadway temperatures at time of sealant application should not exceed 100°F or fall below 36°F. It is recommended that Q-Seal 290 be applied by using a pressurized dispensing system, allowing for positive injection of Q-Seal 290 into the saw cut to properly encapsulate the loop wire. Normally the dispensing system consists of a 10:1 ratio pump with air regulator, gauge and air valves. The primer is an elevator with a follower plate that should be resistant to aromatic hydrocarbons. The hoses used should be Teflon lined with stainless steel cover. The flow gun itself should be a 6000 psi extrusion flow gun with various wand attachments.

To apply the 30 fl. oz. cartridge, use a manual or air-operated caulking gun. We can supply the caulking gun as well.


PACKAGING


Q-Seal 290 is available in Grey or Black, in 5 gallon pails and 30 fl. oz. cartridges.
Shelf Life is 1 year from date of manufacture.


CLEAN UP


Use Chemque solvent S-235. Caution: Clean equipment after use. Use Chemque Q-CLEAN to remove sealant from your hands.


NOTES

Q-Seal 290 Detector Loop Sealant exhibits exceptional chemical resistance to the following chemicals:

  • De-icing salt
  • Gasoline / fuels
  • Hydraulic Brake Fluid
  • Motor Oil
  • Sodium Chloride (5%)


SAFETY AND HANDLING PRECAUTIONS


Contains MDI (methylene diisocyanate). Keep away from heat and open flames. Use only in well ventilated areas. Do not breathe in vapors. Wear an approved respirator mask. In the case of contact, immediately flush eyes or skin with plenty of water for at least ten minutes. If contact is made with your eyes, get immediate medical attention.

CALL NOW TO ORDER: (520) 303-4444

Data from an in-depth report about the installation of pre formed inductive detector loops, written by: Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center. The full, extensive report can be found here: Link

SEALING THE SAWCUT

One of the major challenges in inductive-loop detector technology is protecting the loop wires from breakage, moisture, and from floating to the top of the sawcut and becoming vulnerable to the ravages of traffic. The critical factors are sealant selection and application technique. Sealant types, application methods, and wire protection within the slots are discussed below.

Types of Sealants

Matching the proper sealant with the type and condition of the roadway, together with appropriate, well-supervised installation techniques, are the key factors to effective, maintenance-free inductive-loop detector operation.

During the 1970s, sealant types were about equally divided between asphaltbased and epoxy-based sealants. Early asphalt-based sealants were heated before application. These were soon replaced with gun-grade asphalts marketed as caulking compounds. These, in turn, were superseded by epoxy sealants. The early epoxies were too hard and brittle to adapt well to shifts in pavements and were expensive and difficult to apply.

Available sealants possess a variety of desirable characteristics. Hardness allows the sealant to resist the penetration of foreign materials and street debris such as nails or metal fragments, which might pierce or break the wire. Flexibility allows deformation without cracking during thermal expansion and contraction. Corrosive resistance protects against road salts, gasoline, antifreeze, transmission fluids, brake fluid, and engine oils commonly found on roadway surfaces. Other advantageous sealant properties are good adhesion, and contraction and expansion characteristics similar to those of the highway material in which it is installed.

A rapid curing rate and the ability to be applied to damp surfaces are other beneficial sealant traits. A rapid curing rate is desirable because it minimizes lane-closure time to traffic. During the saw-cutting operation, a water-cooled blade is generally used, and even though the slot may be cleaned with compressed air, some residual dampness may remain. In such cases, it is desirable to apply the sealant directly to damp surfaces rather than first drying them with butane torches, which is time consuming and may damage the asphalt road surface.

Three material families grouped by composition and manufacturing process are recommended for sealing and filling asphalt-surfaced pavements. These are:

  • Cold-applied thermoplastic bituminous materials.
    • Liquid asphalt (emulsion).
    • Polymer-modified liquid asphalt.
  • Hot-asphalt thermoplastic bituminous materials.
    • Asphalt cement.
    • Fiberized asphalt.
    • Asphalt rubber.
    • Rubberized asphalt.
    • Low-modulus rubberized asphalt.
  • Chemically cured thermosetting materials.
    • Self-leveling silicone.

A summary of asphalt concrete crack treatment material types, test methods, applications, and cost is given in Table 5-10. Table 5-11 describes the properties of recommended asphalt concrete sealant materials. Sealant recommended for use with Portland cement concrete are shown in Table 5-12. Synthesis of the state of the technology in overlays for hot-mix asphalt and Portland cement concrete can be found in Reference 10.

STRONG Table 5-10. Asphalt concrete crack treatment materials. SUP ( A 1 A ) SUP STRONG

Material

Applicable specification

Recommended application

Cost range based on 1998 costs ($/kg)

Asphalt emulsion

ASTM D 977, ASTM D 2397, AASHTO M 140, AASHTO M 208

Filling

0.15 to 0.30

Asphalt cement

ASTM D 3381, AASHTO M 20, AASHTO M 226

Filling

0.15 to 0.30

Fiberized asphalt

Manufacturer’s recommended
specifications

Filling

0.35 to 0.60

Polymer-modified emulsion

ASTM D 977, ASTM D 2397, AASHTO M 140, AASHTO M 208

Filling (possibly sealing)

0.80 to 1.20

Asphalt rubber

State specifications, ASTM 5078

Sealing (possibly filling)

0.45 to 0.65

Rubberized asphalt

ASTM D 1190, AASHTO M 173, Fed SS-S-164

Sealing

0.55 to 0.85

ASTM D 3405, AASHTO M 301, Fed SS-S-1401

Sealing

0.65 to 1.10

Low-modulus rubberized asphalt

State-modified ASTM D 3405 specifications

Sealing

0.75 to 1.40

Self-leveling silicone

ASTM D 5893

Sealing

5.75 to 6.75

$1 /kg = $2.17 /lb

Sealant applications are characterized as either cold-pour or hot-pour types. Cold-pour types include polyester resin, epoxies, poly sulfide bases, and rubberized asphalt. The hot-pour varieties include hot pitch, asphalt, and rubberized asphalt. Both cold- and hot-pour sealant must not revert to their liquid state during hot weather as this would allow the loop wire to float to the surface. Sealant should always be fluid enough during application to level itself on a horizontal surface, but should not run when applied on an inclined surface. The sealant must always be applied in strict adherence with the manufacturer’s instructions.

figbul=applicable, figbulfigbul=very applicable.

STRONG Table 5-12. Portland cement concrete sealant materials. SUP ( A 9 A ) SUP STRONG

Material

Applicable specification

Design extension* (%)

Cost range based on 1998 estimated costs ($/L)

PVC coal tar

ASTM D 3406

10 to 20

1.75 to 2.75

Rubberized asphalt

ASTM D 1190, ASTM D
3405, AASHTO M 173,
AASHTO M 301

15 to 30

0.60 to 1.00

Low-modulus
rubberized asphalt

Modified ASTM D 3405

30 to 50

0.70 to 1.20

Polysulfide
(1 and 2 part)

Fed SS-S-200E

10 to 20

Not available

Polyurethane

Fed SS-S-200E

10 to 20

5.20 to 7.20

Silicone
(nonsag)

ASTM D 5893

30 to 50

6.50 to 9.00

Silicone
(self-leveling)

ASTM D 5893

30 to 50

6.50 to 9.50

* Consult manufacturers’ specifications for specific design extensions.

$1 /G = $3.8 /L

Hot tar continues to be used because of its low initial cost. Several States, however, have prohibited its use due to the high percentage of failures and the danger and inconvenience to workers during application. The heat involved (sometimes exceeding 500°F (260°C)) in the process frequently breaks down or deforms the insulation of the loop wire, diminishing its insulating integrity. In addition, hot tar sealant becomes soft in hot weather and allows vehicles to track the tar from the saw cut. Rocks and other debris can penetrate the soft surface and eventually damage the loop wire insulation.

Rubberized asphalt appears to be the sealant of choice, particularly for asphalt pavements. Its use requires the specified loop wire to have insulation that can withstand the 400°F (205°C) application temperature of the rubberized asphalt sealant. Modern epoxy formulations have overcome some of their early drawbacks and are now formulated to provide a greater degree of flexibility.

A number of States have conducted extensive tests of various, commercially available sealant prior to listing the acceptable sealant products in their specifications. In reviewing the documentation of these State tests, a product that scored highest in one State was sometimes considered unacceptable in another State. The disparities in test results are probably caused by differences in geographic and climatic conditions, as well as methods of testing the products. However, most agencies are consistent in product approval criteria. This, in turn, suggests that agencies should periodically validate their tests and test procedures to ensure that their specifications are appropriate.

Sealant Application Techniques

Common practices for sealing the loop wire are depicted in Figure 5-27. One procedure (shown on the left of Figure 5-27) consists of applying a layer of sealant to the floor of the saw cut after thoroughly cleaning and drying the slot. The loop wires are then laid in the slot and covered with a second, final layer of sealant. This method tends to fix the position of the loop wires in the middle of the saw cut, protecting them on the top and bottom. Some agencies believe that this procedure, although more costly, protects the loop wires from water intrusion.

In the technique illustrated in the middle of Figure 5-27, the wire is simply laid in the slot and covered with sealant. There is no way to control the positioning of the wire in the slot. In a three-wire installation, the three layers of wire may form a triangle on the bottom of the slot or may stack over each other.

The backer rod/sealant combination shown on the right of Figure 5-27 is based on the theory that stresses on sealant during elongation are reduced if the sealant has less depth. With this method, the wires are placed in the slot and then a backer rod (generally a closed-cell polyethylene rope) is forced into the slot over the wires. The remainder of the slot is then filled with sealant. The backer rod assures a shallow layer of sealant, reducing tensile stresses and leaving the wires free to adapt to shifting of the pavement. An alternative method that is becoming increasingly popular is to insert short pieces of the backer rod of approximately 1 inch (2.5 cm) in length every foot or two (30 cm to 61 cm) to anchor the wire in the slot before applying the sealant.

Table 5-13 lists commonly used backer rod materials, testing method standards, backer rod properties, and compatibility.

STRONG Table 5-13. Backer rod materials. SUP ( A 9 A ) SUP STRONG

Material

Applicable standard

Properties*

Compatibility

Extruded closed-cell
polyethylene

ASTM D 5249, Type 3

NMA, ECI, NS

Most cold-applied
sealants

Cross-linked extruded
closed-cell polyethylene

ASTM D 5249, Type 1

HR, NMA, ECI, NS

Most hot- and cold
applied sealants

Extruded polyolefin

ASTM D 5249, Type 3

NMA, NS, NG, CI, IJ

Most cold-applied
sealants

* CI = chemically inert, ECI = essentially chemically inert, HR = heat resistant, IJ = fills irregular joint well, NG = nongassing, NMA = nonmoisture-absorbing, NS = nonstaining.

No published evidence of the superiority of one sealant application method over another has appeared. Most inductive-loop detector installers agree that the neat arrangement of wires as shown in many published illustrations is simply not indicative of actual installations; rather, the lay of the wires is random in the slot. They agree that complete encapsulation by the sealant is seldom achievable. Some installers also argue that placing sealant in the bottom of the saw cut (as depicted on the left in Figure 5-27) before laying the wire is time-consuming and requires more road-closure time. Installers indicated that even when this method of installation is specified, it is unlikely to be followed unless an agency inspector was actually overseeing the installation. This is another illustration of the need for careful installation inspection.

On the other hand, proponents of placing sealant on the bottom of the saw cut report that the extra protection afforded by the sealant bed prevents the intrusion of water through small pavement cracks. It also avoids the possibility of sharp edges or rocks becoming dislodged and piercing the installation. Others feel that this is a remote possibility, particularly if the saw cut is well cleaned of debris. Alternatively, some agencies specify the placement of a layer of sand rather than sealant at the bottom of the saw cut. This provides a smooth bed but does not prevent the intrusion of water through pavement cracks.

The amount of sealant to be applied should be sufficient to completely fill the saw cut, but not overfill. A trowel or other tool should be used to ensure that the sealant is slightly below the pavement surface and to remove any excess sealant. Figure 5-28 shows the result of poor installation procedures. It shows overfilling, under filling, and air bubbles in the sealant. All three conditions can lead to inductive-loop detector failure and should have been corrected during the installation process.

Sealant may be applied with a special applicator as shown earlier in Figure 5-6 or by hand directly from a container as depicted in Figure 5-29. In this illustration, one member of the crew is placing the lead-in wires in the slot while another is pouring the sealant into the saw cut. A paint stirrer has been inserted into the slot to hold the wire down while the sealant is being applied. Other techniques can be used (e.g., backer rod strips, and nylon rope) to hold the wire securely in place while sealant is added. Figure 5-30 shows the crew properly completing the sealant application procedure by removing any excess material from the pavement and dusting talc on the fresh sealant.

A number of agencies and loop installers coat the newly applied sealant with sand or talc after the sealant has been applied and before opening the lane to traffic. This prevents tracking of the sealant during its curing process and allows earlier opening of the traffic lane.

Some sunbelt agencies use sand as the sealant by tamping it into the slot after the wire is placed in the sawcut. However, the sand is easily tracked out of the slot and the wires may become dislodged. Therefore, this practice is not recommended.

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